This fall, Open House New York partnered with StreetEasy to create “NYC Uncovered,” a nine-part video series that celebrates our city’s incredible architecture and urban design. Each video highlights a single Open House New York Weekend site, giving viewers a behind-the-scenes look at some of the most popular OHNY Weekend destinations – some that New Yorkers know and love, and others that they may not have had access to before.

Each image below links to a post on the StreetEasy blog with more information about the site and a short video. Enjoy!

 

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Eldridge Street Synagogue

“Built in 1887, the Eldridge Street Synagogue was one of the first temples built in the United States by Ashkenazi Jews. As such, it served has major center for Jewish life and prayer on the Lower East Side. Seamlessly blending understated beauty and historical significance, the site to this day remains an active place of worship as well as museum.” Watch Here

 

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Lowline Lab

“Located at 140 Essex Street just off of Stanton Street, the Lowline Lab is a technical laboratory that mimics the environment of Lowline Park, a proposed underground community space built in a former trolley station. The concept behind the park is to create a green public space in one of the city’s least green and most dense neighborhoods – the Lower East Side.” Watch Here

 

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New York State Pavilion 

“The New York State Pavilion is one of the only remaining structures built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The Fair, organized by Robert Moses, was held in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Queens where the 1939 World’s Fair also took place. The New York Pavilion, designed by the renowned modernist Philip Johnson, was one of the Fair’s main attractions and stood as a symbol of the Space Age and the promise of the future, two of the fair’s central themes.” Watch Here

 

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VIA 57 West

“Architects and engineers refer to Via 57 West as a tetrahedron, a more technical term for describing a triangular pyramid. Due to its carved-out core, the building forms a saddle-like structure, which [Danish architect Bjarke] Ingels has also referred to as a hyperbolic paraboloid. The 709-unit luxury tower is the newest addition to the residential superblock along West 57th Street developed by the Durst Organization.” Watch Here

 

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Masonic Hall

“Since the 19th century, an unassuming office building in Flatiron has been home to the largest Masonic Lodge in New York state. Formally known as the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York, the lodge is still active today and regularly hosts more than 60 other lodges. The hall was built by Harry P. Knowles, a master mason and architect, and spans two office buildings on 23rd Street and rises 19 floors.” Watch Here

 

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General Grant National Memorial

“When [Ulysses S.] Grant died in 1885, he was enormously popular, recognized as both the savior of the Union and a role model of rare political diplomacy, military strategy and masculine brawn. Upon his death, New Yorkers immediately rallied to design and build a memorial commensurate with his impact and legacy.” Watch Here

 

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Apollo Theater

“Few other points of interest are as deeply entwined in a neighborhood’s character and history as Harlem‘s Apollo Theater. Equal parts neighborhood institution and international attraction, the Apollo and its famous marquee are recognized across the city and across the world as symbols of black music and culture.” Watch Here

 

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Brooklyn Army Terminal

“Spanning 95 acres across the waterfront in Sunset Park, the Brooklyn Army Terminal was built in 1919, serving as an important military and supply base. It was designed by Cass Gilbert, the renowned architect of the Woolworth Building and was completed just 17 months after construction began. The complex encompasses 4 million square feet.” Watch Here

 

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Kings County Distillery

“The Brooklyn Navy Yard is home to New York City’s oldest operating distillery, Kings County Distillery, which was just founded in 2010. In 2009, New York state loosened laws that had been restricting local production of alcohol since the time of prohibition. Colin Spoelman, a Williamsburg resident born and bred in Kentucky, and David Haskell, an editor at New York Magazine, immediately saw a business opportunity.  Shortly thereafter, Brooklyn’s first micro-distillery was born.” Watch Here

 

“NYC Uncovered” is presented by StreetEasy in partnership with Open House New York. To learn more about StreetEasy, visit www.streeteasy.com.

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Images: Eldridge Street Synagogue by Peter Aaron/OTTO; Lowline Lab courtesy of Raad Studio; New York State Pavilion by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks; VIA 57 West by Iwaan Baan; Masonic Lodge by Nicolas Lemery Nantel; General Grant National Memorial by D. Stanko/NPS; Apollo Theater courtesy of the Apollo Theater Foundation; Brooklyn Army Terminal by Nicolas Lemery Nantel; and Kings County Distillery courtesy of the site.