Year Round Program


What spaces in New York City most affect the safety of its residents and the justice they experience? As crime in New York falls to its lowest point in modern history, what should a 21
st-century justice system look like, and what kinds of architecture and infrastructure do we need to support it?

Open House New York announces the launch of Spaces of Justice, a yearlong series of tours, panel discussions, and other public programs that will allow the public to examine firsthand the spaces with primary responsibility for producing safety and rendering justice in New York City. The series will provide a platform for those who know the system from the inside—including judges, police and corrections officers, public health practitioners, housing advocates, activists, and people with lived experience of arrest and incarceration—to share their perspectives, and help broaden the public debate about what a twenty-first century justice system in New York looks like.

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Open House New York’s Monograph in Motion is an ongoing series of public tours celebrating the work of design firms that have had a significant impact on New York City’s built environment. Monograph in Motion tours illuminate how larger ideas about design and urbanism are expressed through a firm’s buildings and how those ideas evolve over time across multiple projects.

The next Monograph in Motion explores the work of Beyer Blinder Belle, a firm that is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Founded in the wake of the urban renewal movement of the 1960s, Beyer Blinder Belle pioneered and defined a different approach to the design of the built environment that focused on architecture empowering people–their interaction with each other on streets and in neighborhoods, their pleasure in moving through the city, and their connections to the surrounding physical fabric. The firm’s contributions to improving and enriching the built environment of New York City are immeasurable, through projects like the restoration of Grand Central Terminal, the vision plan and design guidelines that are helping to revitalize Coney Island, and the expansion and renovation of the Morgan Library & Museum (with Renzo Piano Building Workshop), to name just a few.

The breadth of the firm’s work is no more evident than in its participation in OHNY Weekend–with more than twenty projects over the past fifteen years, Beyer Blinder Belle has helped design or restore more OHNY Weekend sites than any other architecture firm in the city. With this Monograph in Motion series, Open House New York is privileged to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of Beyer Blinder Belle, a firm that continues to shape future of New York.

Scroll down to read more about the list of sites that you can tour with Beyer Blinder Belle as part of this series, or click the image below to visit BBB’s site to hear the partners reflect on the firm’s work.

Click the image above to watch a video about Beyer Blinder Belle. 

 

TOURS

 

Met Breuer

Friday, May 18, 2018
6:00-7:00 PM

Marcel Breuer was at the height of his career when he designed the Whitney Museum in 1966. The integrity, beauty, and honesty of the building’s design, materials, and execution define it as one of the most distinguished examples of mid-century modern architecture in New York. Join Beyer Blinder Belle Senior Associates Brett Gaillard and Miriam Kelly for a tour and discussion of the immersive task of restoring the iconic building – including extensive research and an understanding of Breuer’s approach to design and materials – and transforming it into a space for the Metropolitan Museum of Art to exhibit modern and contemporary art.

Tickets
$10 for OHNY Members, $20 for all others. OHNY Members may purchase tickets for themselves and a guest beginning on April 27 at 8 am. General admission sales begin on May 4 at 8am. To purchase tickets, click here.

AIA CES: 1 LU | HSW

 

Brooklyn Navy Yard, Building 77

Tuesday, May 22, 2018
4:00-5:00 PM

Tour Building 77, the largest structure on the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s 300-acre waterfront campus, with Beyer Blinder Belle Partner Elizabeth Leber and Associate Sherrill Moore, joined by Scott Demel, Director of Marvel Architects. Originally built in 1942 as a warehouse for the United States Navy’s operations during WWII, a top-to-bottom rehabilitation has transformed the building into a 21st-century commercial and light industrial hub, with a ground floor marketplace. Tour will include access to upper-floor raw spaces that feature spectacular NYC views, as well as the adjacent BLDG 92, a former 1857 Marine Commander’s house turned visitor center showcasing the Navy Yard’s history and innovations.

Tickets
$10 for OHNY Members, $20 for all others. OHNY Members may purchase tickets for themselves and a guest beginning on May 1 at 8 am. General admission sales begin on May 8 at 8 am. To purchase tickets, click here.

AIA CES: 1 LU | HSW

 

 

New York City Hall

Tuesday, May 29, 2018
6:00-7:00 PM

New York City Hall, completed in 1812, is one of the nation’s oldest government buildings still serving its original purpose. Numerous ad-hoc renovations and modifications over the years had compromised the integrity of the landmarked building. A comprehensive and holistic rehabilitation – the first in more than 50 years – incorporated 21st century systems and technology with as light a touch as possible, preserving the historic fabric and spaces. Join Beyer Blinder Belle Partner Richard Southwick for a tour of the revitalized landmark, including the Rotunda, City Council Chamber, and new below-grade spaces.

Tickets
$10 for OHNY Members, $20 for all others. OHNY Members may purchase tickets for themselves and a guest beginning on May 8 at 8 am. General admission sales begin on May 15 at 8 am. To purchase tickets, click here.

AIA CES: 1 LU | HSW

 

Photo credits: Met Breuer, Peter Aaron; Building 77 and City Hall, John Bartelstone. Courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle. All rights reserved.

On February 7, 2018, National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu approved more than $25 million in grants as part of the NEA’s first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2018. Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $40,000 to Open House New York for Spaces of Justice, a year-long series of tours and programs that will explore the relationship between architecture, urban design, and criminal justice in New York City. The Art Works category focuses on the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and the strengthening of communities through the arts.

Spaces of Justice is the fourth installment of Open House New York’s Urban Systems Series, an ongoing project that explores how economic, environmental, and cultural shifts of the early 21st century are transforming the systems that will shape the future of New York. Previous series have explored the changing spaces of contemporary manufacturing; the network of production and distribution facilities that comprise the city’s food system; and, most recently, the possibilities for a zero waste New York.

Over the last two decades, New York City has seen its homicide rate fall 90 percent while its prison population has shrunk by more than half, transforming it into one of the safest big cities in the United States. In a moment of national support for new approaches to policing and incarceration, the City has a unique opportunity to radically rethink the design of its justice system at every level.

Scheduled to launch this spring, Spaces of Justice is a series of tours, lectures, and other public programs that will explore major questions about the architecture and infrastructure of the criminal justice system in New York City. What are the spaces of justice in New York today and how can they be better conceived to support a system that treats all who pass through them with dignity and respect? As the city considers a shift to smaller prisons, what improvements would this allow in incarceration and rehabilitation? How can urban design choices further reduce crime, especially in areas that continue to experience elevated rates of crime? By creating a public platform to examine these and other questions, Open House New York intends to open up the conversation about the relationship between the physical spaces in which justice is enacted and the outcomes they produce. 

“The choices we make about how to shape our justice system are fundamental to who we are as a community,” said Open House New York executive director Gregory Wessner. “This project invites New Yorkers to think more openly, and more critically, about the state of the city’s justice infrastructure, and to envision what a 21st-century criminal justice system might look like. We are enormously grateful to the National Endowment for the Arts for this grant, and for its support of Open House New York over the past fifteen years.”

For updates about Spaces of Justice, subscribe to Open House New York’s e-newsletter. For more information on projects included in the NEA grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.

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Photo: Jannis Werner/Alamy Stock Photo

When we think of Open House New York, we rightfully think about buildings and the thrill of getting access to the otherwise inaccessible. But this summer, in celebration of the 15th anniversary of Open House New York Weekend, we invite you to join us as we explore some of the deeper values and ideas that make the experience of architecture and cities so powerful, values and ideas that Open House New York itself champions in its programs.

Open House New York has invited a group of leading thinkers from design, art, science, and media for open-ended conversations about life in the contemporary city. In different but compelling ways, the work of each of these individuals helps us better understand the pleasures and frustrations of living an urban life, and asks questions that challenge the way we see and think about the city. Each conversation is structured around a broad theme but all will explore how fundamental values like openness and access help shape our experience of New York and give cities everywhere their vitality and meaning.

All of the talks in this series will take place at 7pm on select Thursday evenings from June through September at LMHQ in the Financial District (150 Broadway, 20th Floor).

Registration
Admission is free but reservations are required as space is limited. Each talk will last approximately one hour, and will be followed by a reception with wine and snacks.

 

Justin Davidson: On Exploration
On June 8, architecture and music critic Justin Davidson will join us for a conversation about exploration to celebrate the publication of his new book, Magnetic City: A Walking Companion to New York

Justin Davidson is the architecture and classical music critic at New York magazine, where he writes about a broad range of urban, civic, and design issues. He grew up in Rome, graduated from Harvard, and later earned a doctoral degree in music composition at Columbia University. As a classical music and cultural critic at Newsday, he won a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 2002. His new book, Magnetic City: A Walking Companion to New York, is a portrait of New York told through art, music, history, literature, and architecture.

 

 

 

Miquela Craytor: On Inclusion
On July 13, Miquela Craytor, a planner and Executive Director of Industrial Partnerships at the NYC Department of Small Business Services, will speak about her work advocating for the use of sustainable development to address reinvestment in under-served communities

Miquela Craytor is the Executive Director of Industrial Partnerships at the NYC Department of Small Business Services.  Her work has consisted of overseeing the city’s revived industrial policy efforts. Projects include the city-wide Industrial Action Plan and overseeing the Futureworks NYC initiatives, a $13 million suite of investments in advanced manufacturing services. She was formerly the executive director at Sustainable South Bronx for over three years. She also served as the Senior Planner for Economic Development in the economic arm of the Bronx Borough President’s office. She received a BA in planning, public policy, & management from the Honors College at the University of Oregon and her MS in city & regional planning from Pratt Institute. She is a 2010 Catto Fellow of the Aspen Institute, a 2010 BMW Transatlantic Fellow, and a board member of the NYC Workforce Development Corporation.

 

Alexandra Horowitz: On Observation
On July 27, scientist Alexandra Horowitz, author of On Looking: A Walker’s Guide to the Art of Observation, will discuss her work on cognition and the ways in which we perceive the world around us

 

Alexandra Horowitz is the author of the New York Times best-seller Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know (2009), On Looking: A Walker’s Guide to the Art of Observation (2013), and Being a Dog: Following the Dog into a World of Smell (2016). She is an adjunct Associate Professor at Barnard College, Columbia University, where she teaches seminars in creative non-fiction and canine cognition, and performs research at the Dog Cognition Lab. She lives and walks in New York City with her husband, young son, and two large, sniffy dogs.

 

 

 

Vishaan Chakrabarti: On Opportunity
On August 3, architect Vishaan Chakrabarti, the Founding Principal of Practice for Architecture and Urbanism, will speak about the city as a platform for a shared, vibrant and diverse culture that fosters opportunity

Vishaan Chakrabarti is the Founder of Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU). Simultaneously, Vishaan is an Associate Professor of Practice at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation (GSAPP), where he teaches architectural design studios and seminars on urbanism. His highly acclaimed book, A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America (Metropolis Books, 2013), argues that a more urban United States would result in a more prosperous, sustainable, joyous, and socially mobile nation. He has been a guest on the Charlie Rose show, MSNBC’s The Cycle, NY1, NPR, WNYC, and has been profiled in the New York Times and the Financial Times.

 

Jorge Otero-Pailos: On Transitions
On August 17, artist and architect Jorge Otero-Pailos, the Director of Historic Preservation at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, will discuss his work exploring transitions from one historical period to the next, and how cultures use monuments to remember, to celebrate, and to come together

Jorge Otero-Pailos works at the intersection of art, architecture and preservation. He is Director and Professor of Historic Preservation at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture in New York. His work has been commissioned and exhibited by major museums, foundations and biennials notably, the Artangel Trust, the 53rd Venice Art Biennial, Victoria and Albert Museum, Louis Vuitton Museum La Galerie, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. He is the founder and editor of Future Anterior, co-editor of Experimental Preservation (2016), author of Architecture’s Historical Turn (2010) and contributor to scholarly journals and books including the Oxford Encyclopedia of Aesthetics and Rem Koolhaas’ Preservation Is Overtaking Us (2014). He studied architecture at Cornell University and holds a PhD from MIT, and was a founding faculty member of the School of Architecture at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico.  

 

Prerana Reddy: On Engagement
On August 24, activist Prerana Reddy, who serves as Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement at the Queens Museum, will speak about the museum’s efforts to engage with the surrounding communities in the most diverse place in the country

Prerana Reddy has been the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement for the Queens Museum since 2005.  She organizes screenings, talks, festivals, visual art exhibitions, artist residencies and performances, many of which are developed in collaboration with diverse local community organizations and cultural producers.  She is also in charge of the museum’s community engagement initiatives that combine arts and culture with social development goals in nearby neighborhoods predominantly comprised of new immigrants such as museum’s offsite immigrant arts & education center Immigrant Movement International, and the design and ongoing programming of Corona Plaza. She holds an MA in Cinema Studies, with a focus on documentary and visual anthropology, from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

 

Charlie Todd: On Delight
On September 7, director and comedian Charlie Todd, the founder of Improv Everywhere, will talk about his mission to surprise and delight through the unconventional use of public space
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Charlie Todd is the founder of Improv Everywhere, producing and directing the group’s work for over fifteen years. Improv Everywhere is a New York City-based comedy collective that stages unexpected performances in public places. Charlie also works as a television producer, serving as creator and executive producer for Improv Everywhere’s television pilot for NBC, and more recently as executive producer for MTV’s late night comedy, The Middle of the Night Show. He is a long-time performer at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in New York City. He is also the author of Causing a Scene (2009), a book about Improv Everywhere published by Harper Collins.

 

 

 

 

This series is organized in partnership with LMHQ. Created by The Alliance for Downtown New York, LMHQ is a collaboration space for Lower Manhattan’s creatives and creators. Companies can come together at LMHQ to collaborate, activate, and accelerate their growth.

 

Photo: spikedhalo via Flickr

 

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

How it Works:

  • Players must register in advance, as space is limited, and may play solo or in teams of up to 6 people. One person will register for your team and will be asked to submit a team name and the names of team members.
  • Each team will also be required to designate one Instagram account from which they will submit photos during the course of the scavenger hunt. Only photos submitted via this account will be counted toward your team’s total.
  • The person who registers your team will receive a follow-up email prompting them to send in any key info not provided on the registration form. If you don’t know your team name, all of the team members, or your preferred Instagram account when completing your registration, that info can be sent later, but must be confirmed prior to the event.
  • On June 17, check in at Open House New York (1133 Broadway, 2nd Floor) between 10 AM and 12 PM to receive clue pamphlets and New York Now Scavenger Hunt t-shirts, which will need to worn in each photo submitted in order to earn points.
  • From 10 AM – 5 PM, decipher clues and race across the city posting photos of you and your team in front of the key sites hinted at in more than sixty clues. To level the playing field, teams can walk, run, or take public transportation between sites—the use of bikes, private cars, or taxis is not allowed.
  • At the end of the day, join us for a closing reception from 5:30-7:30 PM at A/D/O (29 Norman Avenue, Greenpoint, Brooklyn) where drinks and snacks will be served, winners announced, and prizes awarded!

Event Details
New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM
Tickets: $35 per team member

REGISTER TODAY

 

Closing reception hosted by

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Photo: Teri Tynes via Flickr